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Foot Mobilisation Exercises

Even if you don’t suffer from foot pain, this 5-10 minute routine feels great to ‘wake up’ your feet and keep you moving comfortably.  Your feet are the base your body stacks on, so it’s important they stay mobile and working fluidly so they can support comfortable movement of your body.
Naturally, we are meant to walk barefoot on a variety of surfaces; grass, sand, dirt or rocks.  The unevenness of the surfaces encourages our feet to mold and adapt, massaging and mobilising the numerous muscles and joints in our feet.
Modern life finds us constantly wearing shoes and/or walking on smooth, hard surfaces.  We wear boots with hard inflexible soles, or thongs that make us curl our toes to hold the footwear on, restricting the fluid roll through the foot as you walk.  Wearing high heels puts unnatural pressures on your ankles and joints of your feet.  This means our feet lose their mobility and can become painful.
In my mid forties I began long distance running, and after a couple years developed foot pain.  I spent a lot of time and money looking for solutions.  This routine is a result of that research and self experimentation to come up with a combination of exercises and movements that has worked well not only for me, but also for numerous clients I have shared it with.
I recommend you aim to do the routine twice daily, especially before a walk or running activity to warm up your feet and get the joints moving freely.  Your feet will thank you.

 

Twenty Seconds of Courage… can change your life

The adage that confidence only builds after you take action, not before, has underscored much of my life. I can think of situations where I lacked confidence and only after I stepped up and gave it a go, did I feel my confidence start to build.

Waiting for confidence and motivation to arrive, can mean you never begin working on that dream.

Many great business ideas die before they get started.  Healthy consideration of your next move is important for good decisions, but too much thinking and planning may actually mean you give in to fear and anxiety.

Excuses like “I’m too busy”, “the timings not right”, “I can’t afford it”…. undermines our confidence, motivation and inspiration.

In the movie “We bought a zoo”, the main character Benjamin Mee used a motto of “all it takes is 20 seconds of courage” to help him seize opportunities in moments of hesitation where fear had potential to overwhelm him.

These days I enjoy getting started and then going with the momentum.

I also love the title of Susan Jeffers’ book “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway”, which reminds me being scared is normal … but don’t let it stop you.

Over 25 years ago Nike introduced the advertising slogan “Just do it” that became the motivational cry for many successful business and sports people across the world.

Stop waiting for the confidence or perfect moment.  Jump in, get started and sort it out as you go. Gather up your courage and “Just do it!”

What CAN you do?

Rena Walker at East Point, Darwin NT

What if 2020 tuned out to be the best year of your life?
What if the restrictions brought about by COVID-19 were the best thing that ever happened to you?

Try exploring these questions.  I have found they can be an excellent way to change your mindset and view the current situation in a different light.  Look at the opportunities and possibilities and the things we CAN do rather than what we can’t. Much, much better for our mental health!
Change can be challenging and scary.  Fear of the future can leave us frozen.  Read More…

Boost your Health and Well-being

Health is when every cell in your body is bouncing with joy.

 

 

Implementing regular habits to maintain good health and well-being goes hand-in-hand with boosting your immune system to build up resistance to, and fight off, a virus or infection.

Here are a few tips.

Read More…

Exercises for back care

One of the most common reasons people come to me is back pain.  After immediate treatment, it is my experience that it is important to follow up with regular, gentle exercises and stretches to keep your back mobile.

These exercises can enhance your recovery and help avoid recurrence of pain.  If you have suffered with long term back pain you will know that it requires constant maintenance.

Book here if it’s time for a kinesiology treatment.

Download your PDF copy of Exercises for back care

 

Eat A Rainbow

For the past couple of weeks I have been away, and even though I ate a reasonably ‘healthy’ diet, it wasn’t as high in vegetables and fruit as I’m used to.  Plus, I ate more bread and sugary items than is good for me.  The result: I felt sluggish and bloated, unmotivated to exercise and my mind felt foggy.

After a few days of eating whole plant foods almost exclusively, my mind feels much clearer and my energy has improved.

As I prepared dinner last night I was reminded of a dietary principle from my Kinesiology training: “eat a rainbow” – aim to have a rainbow on your plate at each meal. Foods that are red, yellow/orange, green, blue/purple and white.

An easy way to achieve this is to include a variety of whole plant foods,

By focusing on eating whole foods in a variety of colours you are consuming a broad range of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other plant-based nutrients.

Our western diet has become very high in ‘white’ foods.  We love our white potato and refined carbohydrates, consequently we have the health issues associated with consuming a diet with such a limited nutritional range.

Below are some of the benefits of “eating a rainbow”. Read More…

The gift of receiving

A few years ago, I was having a tough time with some confronting personal issues. My mother asked who could help and support me. I told her that I had some great friends, but they had their own issues and I didn’t want to trouble them.

Mum went on to give me a new perspective…

“When you help someone, do you feel good?”

“Yes I do”

“Have you ever thought that when you don’t allow someone help you, you are denying them that good feeling,”

I now have a new attitude towards accepting help when it’s offered. I gratefully accept!

I have shared this story with many friends and clients over the years, because accepting help can be challenging for all.

If you have difficulty asking for or accepting help, it can be worthwhile to explore your beliefs about receiving help.

Is it a feeling of being unworthy? The person offering help has already decided you are worthy and deserving in their eyes.

Are you a perfectionist that sees yourself as a failure if you ask for help? Read More…

Create some friction!

A few weeks ago, I watched an interview with Gweneth Paltrow, where she was talking about how being a success at a young age meant that many people came into her life to help smooth the way and make life easy. It wasn’t until her father sat her down and suggested that she was in danger of becoming an A-hole, that she realised that a bit of “friction” in life is a good thing.

She expressed perfectly something I have been thinking about and working on myself. I noticed that when someone achieves success, they sometimes slide backwards (often dramatically) soon after. I wonder if, without the ‘friction’ created by striving for success, these people step back and stop challenging themselves to become better people and to improve and enhance their skills.

The ongoing challenges we face every day can be good for us! Needing to earn an income to pay bills and mortgages means we Read More…

Get moving!

Sitting is the “new smoking”

A couple of weeks ago as I was cycling along Dick Ward Drive I was pleased to see how many people were commuting on bicycles.  I remember my granddad cycled to and from work for most of his life.  In those days it was common for people to walk or cycle as their primary mode of transport.  In fact, a normal day 50 years ago incorporated much more incidental activity than these days.

The growing use of computers, television, appliances and service industries, has led to a sedentary population and an increase in the dis-ease associated with inactivity.

How did you spend your last 24 hours?  Was most of it spent sitting? Studies show that many adults spend more than 8 hours sitting each day and almost 50% of the population do no physical activity at all!

Sitting has been called the “new smoking’ because of the associated negative health effects, such as:

  • weight gain and poor circulation potentially increasing your risk of heart disease
  • back and neck pain – the seated position puts huge stress on your spine
  • increase risk of cancer – lung, colon and endometrial
  • increased risk of diabetes
  • varicose veins caused by blood pooling in the legs
  • Weak bones leading to osteoporosis – move it or lose it!

Even if you go to the gym and work out regularly, 7 hours spent sitting can undo all that good work. It’s not just less calories burnt, it’s the actual sitting.  Many offices have introduced standing desks, but what about the time you spend commuting, watching TV or on electronic devices?

Hours spent sitting alone with a screen-based activity, can disrupt sleep and often causes you to avoid socialising, withdraw from family and friends, potentially leading to social anxieties and depression.

Even just short bursts of activity throughout the day accumulates to provide numerous benefits and an increased level of activity going a long way towards avoiding the health risks above. Read More…

What could you acheive if you pushed a little harder?

Fannie Bay Swim, Darwin, NT 2019

A year ago, I remember standing at the end of a triathlon chatting to a friend who, like me, finishes among the last ten competitors.

We discussed the “top guns” and how in awe we were of their ability and fitness. She said “Have you ever thought that the reason they’re so good is that they push themselves harder than we do? I notice that when they lap me on the run they’re breathing much more heavily than I am”

This conversation popped into my thoughts many times since and I now use it as motivation to go a little faster, harder and/or further in training sessions and events.

I have achieved some new ‘personal bests’ as my reward for the extra effort, not to mention better self-esteem.

In my life outside triathlon training and events, I know that when I feel frustrated, it is often the result of giving in to fear, making excuses and allowing myself to sit in a comfort zone rather than pushing to my potential. Like a racehorse at the start of a race, itching to get out and run, but being held back by the gate Read More…

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