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Take your rest!

Taking a break!

“Take your rest!  You can’t go hard for the next set if you don’t take your rest!”  This was the voice of the coach this morning at swimming training.

You see I am a slow swimmer and in a mistaken attempt to keep up with the group I was skipping the 10 second rest break and continuing to swim the next lap.  After all 10 seconds isn’t going to make much difference right?  Wrong!  I discovered even a short rest meant I could swim harder and faster the next lap.

Every training program I have seen for triathlons, marathons etc, always have rest days as part of the schedule as well as rest breaks within the daily programs.  This shows me that if endurance athletes, who are training to push themselves beyond normal limits, take rests, then the benefits of rest shouldn’t be underestimated.

One of the most common reasons people come to see me is because they are tired and burnt out.  Frequently, these people have been pushing themselves to stay on top of their workload, whether it’s from their job or from personal or family demands.  Read More…

Just breathe….


Swimming at Darwin Waterfront

A secret discovered at the dawn of Mankind, refined by many cultures to an art form, often forgotten in today’s hectic world … JUST BREATHE.
A hunter stalking the African savannah, a warrior going into battle, a yogi seeking enlightenment, a woman giving birth. A simple solution to focus, survive and prosper … JUST BREATHE

This is a regular reminder I give myself and others to reduce stress and tension, to assist performance in an exercise session and to navigate challenging situations calmly.
Sometimes I unconsciously hold my breath when I’m doing something difficult.  It’s not just physical exertion. I catch myself not breathing when doing housework, concentrating on writing an assignment or blog, or even reading instructions to put together a flat pack! Do you do the same?
I remind clients to breathe deeply because it assists corrections with kinesiology.  A few deep breaths calm and energise you when feeling stressed and overwhelmed.  It is not by chance that breath provides focus and calmness in yoga and is crucial to meditation practices.
But if you can’t breathe deeply? Read More…

Getting stuff done

A few weeks ago, I worked with a client who was struggling with procrastination. You know, that great thief of time.

She had a series of assessments she needed to hand in to complete her course; she frequently found herself being distracted and avoided getting them done.  A few days after our session she contacted me to say she had already finished five, and was well on her way to completing the rest.

I often work with clients who feel stuck or blocked, who struggle with procrastination and avoid uncomfortable tasks.  They sabotage their own ability because they don’t feel ready, or lack the confidence, energy, time or motivation to make that first move and then follow through.

This is a subject I feel somewhat of an expert on – there was a stage where the “pro” in procrastination could have referred to me. Here are some of the ideas and techniques I use to keep procrastination at bay.

Just start!

Above my desk I have a hand-embroidered sign that simply says “Start”.

This has been an invaluable reminder when it’s time to write another blog and I find myself sitting at my desk staring at a blinking cursor on a blank computer screen.   To just type notes and develop ideas gives me a base to build my next article.

Sometimes the pathway or process to completion only comes to light after you get started. Read More…

Making change successfully

The New Year is a great opportunity to set goals and achieve change. Whether it be to quit smoking, get fit, lose weight, write a novel, complete a degree or buy a house … success depends on our willingness to make change.

We might be willing to change on a conscious level but unwilling at a subconscious level, especially if the problem is a crutch we have come to rely on.

Once we are aware of and understand subconscious blocks, we can work on letting them go.  It is difficult, but not impossible.

A while ago, I worked with a university student who came to see me when she was in the last semester of completing her degree.  Previously she had been a diligent student but now found herself unmotivated, avoiding study, procrastinating about assignments and generally sabotaging her ability to complete her courses to graduate.

In her Kinesiology session we found that for the past few years her goal had been to complete her degree.  When that goal was imminent, she began to sabotage her success because she feared life in the “real world” as a graduate. She subconsciously wanted to stay in the “safe world” of university. Read More…

Flat belly please?

Last week I received my favourite kind of bonus payment after an appointment – a hug from a very happy client.

I noticed she had difficulty sitting up from lying down. She told me that even though she regularly exercised to strengthen her abdominals she had very little success in even feeling them work. I asked her if she would like me to see if I could help.

After a few tests and corrective techniques she was able to sit up more easily, and could actually feel her muscles working. She will still need to exercise to develop strong abdominals, but it should be easier and more productive from now on.

Sturdy abdominal muscles are an important part of developing a “strong core” – the area of your body commonly referred to as your midsection or torso.  A strong core involves all your muscles from the front, back and sides (plus more) to work together effectively to stabilize and support your entire body.

Would you like to have a flat belly? Do you suffer from back pain? Do you have poor posture? Have you tried abdominal strengthening exercises but can’t seem to get the muscles to work? Read More…

How do you see yourself?

A couple of years ago, while standing on the shore of Lake Alexander awaiting the start of a triathlon, one of the ladies I was standing with, said something that triggered a big “AHA!” moment for me.  To paint a picture for you, at the beginning of each triathlon I would stand with a few other ladies and we would discuss our fears and short comings in the swim leg.  I had trained regularly and knew I could swim the distance and even had a few triathlons and open water swims under my belt, but still there I was “shaking in my boots”!

Then one of the ladies shared something her husband had said. “You know what your problem is?  You still see yourself as a crap swimmer and that’s not true anymore!

Have you ever heard something that you just KNEW you were meant to hear?  This was one of those moments for me.

That was my problem too!  I still saw myself as the person who stood panting at the end of pool after swimming only 50 metres!  How would I ever manage to swim 750 metres in open water?

As I swam and continued through the triathlon I thought about how I had unconsciously maintained this untrue perception of myself.  Allowing it to not only sabotage my performance, but also my enjoyment of the swim.  Then, I started questioning other areas of my life where untrue perceptions of myself could be sabotaging my performance and enjoyment. Read More…

Stress

Stress seems to be one of the main causes of imbalances and dis-ease in your body and one of the most important things I address with you as a client is your stress levels.   Trying to relieve pain, body imbalances or dis-ease without addressing stress is unlikely to be successful in the long term.  In fact, I frequently find that, reducing and managing stress better, goes a long way in resolving the problem the client has presented with.

Kinesiology is based in the knowledge that your body is a self-healing, self-regulating, self-perpetuating (replacing its own tissues) organism. Essentially everything we need for survival apart from food, air and water is found within the body itself.

Sometimes your body loses the ability to efficiently perform these activities resulting in pain, illness, low energy etc.  Kinesiology uses a variety of processes to help your body re-balance and re-connect with the ability to heal, regulate and perpetuate itself.

Read More…

The healing power of a hug

 

Touch is not only nice.  It’s needed.  Research supports the theory that touch is necessary for our physical and emotional well being.

Therapeutic touch is recognised as an essential tool for healing; to help relieve pain, depression and anxiety, to bolster patients’ will to live and to help babies grow and thrive.

One special form of touch is the hug.   Read More…

Time for a fresh start? Time to declutter

It’s the first new moon of 2018 and I’ve decided NOW is the time to clear out my clutter.  I have made forays into clearing out and cleaning up before but this time I plan to dig deep and really clear my space.

One of the principles discussed in my training as a Kinesiologist is “What is in your universe (environment) is also within you”.  Meaning a cluttered home could indicate; a cluttered mind, an overweight body, inability to live in the present moment and/or not happy with the person you are.

Clearing clutter is an emotional process, but if you follow through when the frustration and overwhelm kicks in, it can be a life changing activity.  To help keep me motivated I have done some research into the benefits of clearing clutter so I have something positive to focus on while I work through my “stuff”.  I am sharing them here… Read More…

Hot & Bothered? Take time to rest

In our busy ‘build up’ season it is extra important to take time to rest (and cool off).

Over the past few years I have come to realise how important it is to schedule rest into an exercise program.  Every Ironman training program I have looked at incorporates a rest day every week and a light training recovery week every month. Research in weight training has shown, that on average, people work 7% harder in subsequent sets after they have rested.  This means resting effectively, helps to improve your performance.

It occurs to me that the same principle applys in everyday life.  There seems to be recognition and admiration for people who work long hours and the ability to “push through” is regarded as a quality to strive for. Read More…

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